The Nintendo Switch™: Is this the success Nintendo needs?

So Nintendo has shown off their next console: the Nintendo Switch™.
This machine is a touchscreen with detachable controllers called Joy-Cons.  What a user can do is either play it while the device is connected to the TV, or take it out of the dock, and play games on the go.  The device has a number of controller options, including using the Joy-Con controllers, using a Nintendo Switch Pro controller, and just using the touchscreen.  The whole display will  be in full high-definition, and will probably support multi-touch capabilities.  It has been reported that the device has an nVidia Tegra GPU in it, so Nintendo has switched (no pun intended) to a new graphics card maker, and has moved on from ATI/AMD. It also looks as though the device supports cards similar to those used in the 3DS, but I’m sure it has on-board storage, as well. Now I need to ask the question: why should I care about this device?  I already have a PC which can play a number of games quite easily (maybe not the most recent games at the highest settings), as well as a good mobile phone and tablet. So for the most part, I’m not interested. There is a good number of publishers who are saying they will support the Switch. But what will they actually release on the device?  My guess is that, at first, they will release ports for the device (or games that have been remastered). But then what?  Would Bethesda release the next Elder Scrolls game on the Switch? It’s unlikely, considering that they’ll probably release it for the PS4 and Xbone, and of course they’ll have a PC version.  Maybe they’ll make a smaller version, or perhaps they’ll release the mobile version on the Switch.  If that were to happen, though, why would anyone care?  Couldn’t a user just play the mobile version on their phones or tablets?  How would that version be different? Bethesda may release an Elder Scrolls game on the Switch, but it won’t be a version that’ll be found on the other consoles, that’s for certain.

How about other parts of the device?  Will it have specs comparable to the PS4 and the Xbone?  Probably, however those two consoles already have upgraded versions on the way.  It’s true that they won’t be huge improvements over the originals (supposedly, the PS4k will have support for 4k televisions and be capable of running most games at 60FPS.  But that’s it), but they still have
specs that some big developers will like.  How about the development environment for the Nintendo Switch?  Can one easily take their Steam game and port it over to the Switch?  There were a big number of indie developers who really wanted to port their games over to the Wii U.  But the hardware was just too foreign from their familiar hardware to justify a port.  Thankfully, a number of games (such as Axiom Verge) did make it to the Wii U.  But is this enough to keep the new console afloat?

Among other big developers who have pledged support include the old vanguard of Sega, Capcom, and Square-Enix.  These three are laughable, as they have been hemorrhaging money for years.  Sega has lost millions over the past few years (though more recently they have rebound), Capcom has only been kept afloat by Street Fighter, as well as old re-releases of Mega Man and Resident Evil, and Square-Enix has seen marginal return on their mobile phone offerings (don’t even get me started on Final Fantasy).  What are they going to release on the Nintendo Switch?  How are they going to take advantage of the device?  Probably in the same way as the Wii: release only a small number of games, some re-releases, as well as “test” games, and see whether they are a success.  So it’s unlikely we’ll see some big games from these developers (although the remake of Final Fantasy 7 does not seem far-fetched.  Twenty years too late, is what I think).  Other developers include Konami, Activision, and Electronic Arts, but I really doubt they will release anything worthwhile on the Switch.

There are other developers who do look promising.  Platinum Games is making something, and with their track record with Nintendo, they’ll probably make some great content.  Others include From Software, but my guess is that they’ll port over Dark Souls or Bloodborne, so nothing new there.  Another developer on the list is Nippon Ichi, most famous for their Disgaea games.  What they’ll have is anyone’s guess.  Then there’s Epic Games.  That one is a bit of an enigma: why would they develop for the device?  Why would they care?  I have not a clue what they would make for the Nintendo Switch.

All of this information is wonderful, but the public needs to know other things. As I have mentioned, it needs to have specs similar to the competition, so what the final specs will be is unknown.  How will the games be played on it?  Will they all use cards, or will discs be supported?  What are the online capabilities for the Switch?  Since this is Nintendo we’re dealing with, we know it won’t be as good as the competition (probably little voice support, a gimped messaging system, and no online friends group support).  I’m sure the Switch will be region-free (even Iwata talked about this), so that will be a welcomed addition. But all of this will mean nothing if the software and feature support is solid.

We’ve seen the list of developers who are supporting the Switch, but what other features will it have?  In time, those will be revealed.  But is this something that Nintendo is showing that they are different, that they will listen to their fans, and possibly make the games that some of their fans want?  It’s impossible to please all of the fans, but there has been huge criticism for major Nintendo games over the past year.  Star Fox Zero was critically panned and Super Paper Mario: Color Splash was also criticized.  Let’s not forget how different Metroid Prime: Federation Force is from other Metroid games. So how is management going to be different for the Switch?  Will they be more willing to support third party developers (and I’m talking about actually throwing
money at them to develop exclusive content for the Switch, as well as helping them with developing the games)?  Will they make their online system more open to those consumers who just want to freely converse and play with other, different users? Will they allow for the users a little bit of freedom in Miiverse, to show content that may be a bit more grown-up?  Of course, there will still be moderators. It is doubtful, as Nintendo’s management has changed little since Iwata’s passing.

I feel that, if Nintendo really wants to recapture the consumers they lost to the competition, they will have to change some of the leadership at the top.  Even though they got a new president, mostly what has changed was what departments the current management looks over (most of the titles changed to “deputy <title>”, so they have a deputy director of marketing.  I guess they became deputies when they got a new sheriff in town).  It’s true that Nintendo has been getting younger developers into their company, and did try to find a younger president.  But their leadership cannot be made up of people who haven’t not been able to turn around their sales over the past few years. “A problem cannot be solved with the same level of thinking that created it,” as Einstein once said.

Is it too early to say whether this will be a big-selling machine?  Possibly.  But if Nintendo’s track record, their current corporate structure, and the list of developers is anything to go by, it’s doubtful that the Switch will be a best-selling machine five years down the line.

Research in Developing a Budget for Video Games

Since I like video games, and I know a thing or two about accounting, I thought of writing and recording a video which delves into how the budget for a video game is constructed. I have tried to find out how some major game developers make their budgets, but I have hit a road block. You see, major video game developers rarely give out specific details on how their video game projects are constructed and financed. This is probably due to the reason other studios could steal their ideas, or take advantage of some weakness they may show. It would still be nice to see how a video game is budgeted.

It seems the best I can find is from indie developers. While that is some good insight in how a video game may come together for small-time developers, I would like to see how a large video game developer, and major publishers, figure out the costs associated with development. It looks like that video is going to take a while.

The Problems With the Internet of Things

As more and more Internet of Things (IoT) devices are bought and set up, there is a growing concern for what they can do, in addition to their normal purpose.  The security researcher, Brian Krebs, had his website brought down by a Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attack.  The company who formerly hosted Krebs and his security, Akamai, said that the attack was brought on by hundreds of hacked IoT devices (he has since started using Google’s protective services).  This didn’t use reflection or replication attacks, either; it used traditional methods of denial of service, by flooding his site for requests.  Akamai says that this is the largest DDoS they have ever seen.  This brings me to the question: how can we prevent and/or mitigate these sort of attacks?

This attack was brought on mainly by unsecured, un-maintained IoT devices.  More recently, these devices have been manufactured, released, and not updated.  The average consumer of these IoT devices know that the features of the device make it such that one can easily control it from afar, often times with one’s mobile phone.  What they do not realize is that hackers can also break into these devices and use them, too.  Often, the manufacturer will throw in a free OS (such as GNU/Linux), add on their thin, proprietary layer, and sell it.  They do not realize the problem they are creating, as exemplified in the attack on Krebs’ website.

It is true that there is a cost to updating and maintaining these devices.  Which company wants to have a costly developer staff just to update the software on their line of light bulbs?  Then again, which company wants to be known for the product which aided in bringing down Google’s servers?  Either way, there’s going to have to be a way for these devices to get updated.

Usually what a user will find on these IoT devices is an embedded OS like GNU/Linux.  So why not develop a distribution that utilizes open standards and receives regular update?  Similar to Android, yet with stricter guidelines.  A company could, for instance, set up a distribution with safety, compatibility, and interoperability in mind.  They could work with the IoT device manufacturers in making products that work together, and can be updated regularly.  Though let’s not just talk about the manufacturers; the consumer also has a responsibility, too.  (It’s worth noting that there is an embedded GNU/Linux distribution that can be easily built and configured for IoT devices.)

The average consumer of IoT devices will have to learn about the extended benefits of these IoT devices, and they must realize that they come with a much greater risk.  Indeed, one cannot put a simple toaster in the same category as a light bulb which one can control with a mobile phone.  They must be made aware that an attacker can take control of their IoT devices and used for malicious purposes.  This doesn’t mean that they need to be scared into acting, though, because actions made in fear are, often times, poor choices.  They should be informed that it’s possible for this to occur, and that there are forces in place which are trying to counter these attacks.

Going forward, companies that make IoT devices, and consumers of IoT devices, must be more safety conscious, for there are malicious forces in the world who are ready and able to make use of these devices for their own nefarious purposes.

So I wrote a cute screensaver

A few months ago, I found a GIF of Kirby (or rather a bunch of Kirbys) dancing. I thought, This would be even cooler if it was set to music. So I set about writing a simple, little HTML5 screensaver.

In the Cinnamon Desktop for Linux Mint, you can write screensavers in HTML5 (technically, it uses Webkit, but we all know that’s a fancier version of KHTML). So I wrote this, chose some dance music, and had it play said dance music randomly every time the computer screen is locked.

If you wish to see a video of it in action, here it is: